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Roasted Okra

September 18, 2011
by Jackie Garvin

Roasting vegetables is nothing new to me.   I’ll roast anything thing that tries to move.  Recently, it occurred to me that I had never roasted one of my very favorite vegetables: okra. When it’s okra season, they’re always on my mind. I’ll use fresh if I can find good ones but I’m not the least bit snobbish about using frozen. Okra is a vegetable that freezes well.

There’s no time like the present and, fortunately, I had okra in the freezer.   I thawed and drained them.   Place them on a baking sheet sprayed with non-stick spray, drizzled olive oil on them, sprinkled a generous dose of 4-1-1 seasoning and roasted at 450 degrees for about 30 minutes until they starting turning brown.

Goodness gracious day in the morning!  They are unbelievably good.  You really get the flavor of fried okra without all the extra work and clean up.  For those of you with an aversion to okra because of the texture (you say slim, I say texture),  you should give this version a try.  Roasting takes care of the “texture”.  I’ll eat okra anyway you throw it at me so the “texture” isn’t offensive to me.

The okra browns up nicely which gives it a wallop of flavor. Brown mean flavor.  I especially like the seeds that escape from the pod and get crispy.

I’ll be thinking about Roasted Okra until I eat it again….which will be tomorrow.

Roasted Okra

1 pound whole okra pods, small ones are best

olive oil

4-1-1 seasoning

Place on a baking tray that’s covered in foil and/or sprayed with non-stick spray.  Roast at 450 degrees for 20 to 25 minutes until browned.  Stir  and flip occasionally so both sides will brown.

 

 

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17 Comments leave one →
  1. sherrie permalink
    September 18, 2011 11:30 am

    i dated a fella who told me his fave food of all time was okra. i wasn’t so familiar w/it so i asked how he liked it cooked. he belly laughed and said there was only one way to cook it. i didn’t wanna feel stupid so i didn’t ask how that was. i asked my momma who explained to roll it in corn meal and fry it in bacon grease. i worked so hard on that dish and even had a test run in momma’s kitchen. i was so excited to serve it to him. he tasted it and said ain’t nuttin wrong w/that. i was crushed! that’s all? i knew there was nothing wrong w/it, but it wasn’t fabulous? my momma later explained that if fried okra was his fave food then that comment was his way of saying it was amazing. lol!

    • September 18, 2011 2:28 pm

      Sherrie,

      The fella was a little reserved with his emotions! What a funny story! I’m sure your fried okra was fabulous. Do you still make it? :)

      • sherrie permalink
        September 18, 2011 5:24 pm

        no! i couldn’t get over the slimy furriness of it. (aka “texture”) lol! i would prob make it if i have a special request from a prince charming. too bad this one moved away. he has no idea what he’s missing! ;)

        • September 18, 2011 5:48 pm

          Sherrie,

          May your prince charming make an appearance soon! Okra Dude is definitely missing out. You just go on to bigger and better things. :)

      • sherrie permalink
        September 18, 2011 7:45 pm

        thank you, Jackie! :)

  2. trish permalink
    September 18, 2011 3:08 pm

    That sure sounds good… have to try this one. as I love okreee any way you make it… LOL

  3. September 18, 2011 3:11 pm

    Non-Southerners just don’t know what they are missing. I love Okra, but rarely find it in the grocery store. What I also miss are black-eyed peas. I have NEVER found them in the grocery store. I once found them at a farmer’s market near where my son went to college, and thought I had died and gone to heaven. Mom used to fix the black-eyeds the way she fixed green beans–with bacon and onion–and then put fresh okra on top to steam just a bit before serving. The okra was a bit slimy, but still delicious.

    • September 18, 2011 3:32 pm

      Joyce,

      I keep frozen okra in my freezer when the season for fresh is over. It freezes very well. I usually put some up sliced, whole and breaded.

      I rarely make Southern peas without putting okra on the top just as your mother did. I hope you give roasted okra a try. Even though I’m a die-hard okra lover, I was surprised by how good they are. :)

  4. September 19, 2011 9:10 pm

    I’m anxious to try this method. I had some okra at Husk in Charleston, SC this summer that had been charred – presumably on the grill – that took most of the slime out. I hadn’t even thought to roast it in the oven though. I have some from my CSA and now I’m anxious to try it. Thanks!

    • September 20, 2011 6:53 am

      Danielle,

      I hope you give this a try. I’m going to roast my a little longer next time and flip them so they get caramelized on both sides. They smelled so good I couldn’t wait to get them out of the oven. Please let me know how they turn out for you. :)

  5. Jean permalink
    September 23, 2011 2:37 pm

    I sometimes bake my okra…but the pods need to be rather small to cut down on the slime factor. It is so good when it gets crisp. I can eat my weight in it!

  6. Jolene permalink
    September 23, 2011 9:54 pm

    Jackie,
    I have tor try roasting the okra. We don’t get it fresh up here in the PNW so I have to depend on the frozen variety. I’m gonna try it this weekend. Thanks for the idea.

    • September 24, 2011 3:56 pm

      Jolene,

      I used frozen okra and it worked just fine. Thaw and drain it first. Roast until the pods are well browned. YUM!!

  7. Anita permalink
    March 31, 2012 5:32 pm

    Okra is good to fight Cholesterol!

    • April 1, 2012 6:55 pm

      Anita,

      In addition to okra being healthy, it just flat out tastes good!

      Thanks for stopping by. :)

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